Debate Over Legal Gun Device, Las Vegas Shooter Used in Massacre

Bump Stock Debate over Legal Device Las Vegas Shooter Used in Massacre

WTVO/WQRF - As investigators dig through mounds of evidence in the Las Vegas shooting, the conversation shifts to gun legislation. The shooter used a gun modification called a bump stock.  It allowed Stephen Paddock's rifles to fire at a much faster rate.

This is receiving support from both sides of the aisle. Democrats and Republicans are looking at potentially regulating the law that makes this device legal.

"A lot of us are coming up to speed on what this is," said House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) about bump stocks.

They are devices that can fire bullets, nearly as fast as automatic weapons. This device has garnered a lot of attention, since the country witnessed the worst mass shooting in modern history.  Reports have revealed that the Las Vegas shooter used 12 Bump Stock devices to kill 58 and injure nearly 500 people.  Winnebago County Sheriff's Department Sgt. Glenn Heidenreich says the device is completely legal.

"They're legal because they're not changing the mechanics of the weapon itself," said Sgt. Heindenreich.  "The recoil of the gun would then go back and forth, and cause it to fire more rapid than it would if it were individual fire."

Sgt. Heidenreich says he's never encoutered a bump stock modified weapon.  He's more likely to encounter fully automatic weapons, which have been banned since 1986.  He believes bump stocks are rare in the Stateline  due to the fact that the devices are not widely known.  While bump stock devices don't modify the weapon to be completely automatic, some say the reality that they are as effective, has brought on concern from U.S. leaders, like Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-16th).

"Nobody knew what these were three days ago, and now everybody knows," said Rep. Kinzinger.  "So, we look at potential copycat killers and things like that, and they may now utilize these devices. I think it's imperative we move quickly on this."

Ryan also believes the law needs to be revised.

"This seems to be a way to go around that," said Ryan.  "So, obviously we need to look at how we tighten up the compliance with this law,"

Kinzinger said he will lead a call to action in order to figure out what can be done about the device.  The ATF declined to comment. 


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