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Doctors Urge People to be Extra Careful While Traveling in the Snow

<p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt;" class="MsoNormal"><span size="3" style="font-family: Times New Roman;">When the unusually warm weather came to a sudden halt and the skies turned white, many people across the Stateline forgot just how dangerous the snow and ice can be.</span></p>
The snow doesn't exactly make getting around very easy, and it forced people like Ashley Washam to spend extra time cleaning off her car, and to be extra cautious on the road.

 

"The road and the crazy drivers, there's lots of accidents, a lot of people don't know how to drive I guess," said Washam.

 

The constant snow fall and slick roads kept ambulances at SwedishAmerican Hospital busy responding to slips and falls as well as car accidents.

 

"The most common things are people that fall and break their wrists," said Emergency Medical Services director at SwedishAmerican Hospital Dr. John Underwood.

 

The snow turned sidewalks into slip and slides keeping walkers on their toes and sometimes on their backs.

 

"It's supposed to get worse, so definitely watch out," said Washam.

 

Drivers around the area dodged wrecks left and right doing everything they can to avoid the worst.

 

"We do see a large number of motor vehicle accidents, it seems to take us a little while before we learn to drive on the snow again," said Dr. Underwood.

 

That's why Dr. Underwood is warning people to take your time no matter what you do.

 

"A little common sense as far as, being on icy surfaces, dress up warmer, as my mom always said, 'if your feet are cold put on a hat,'" said Dr. Underwood.

 

But many would say we've been lucky so far this winter, and for Washam, finally seeing snow brings her a bit of joy.

 

"It doesn't feel like January without snow, it didn't feel like Christmas, I'm glad that it's snowing finally," said Washam.

 

Dr. Underwood says it's also important for anyone out shoveling the snow to stay hydrated and if you're older to make sure you take breaks often, as they he says heart attacks become more common when clearing away the snow.

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