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How Stateline Flooding Could Affect Fourth Of July Boating

<span style='font-family: "Times New Roman"; font-size: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA;'>A boating bust on the Fourth of July, as the "No Wake Ordinance" on the <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:place w:st="on">Rock River</st1:place> could last until the holiday</span>

Stateliner Frederick Heuser just took his bout out in the Rock River near Fordham Dam, and let's just say it was not the most pleasurable experience.

 

Heuser says "it took to go up one mile up the river almost two hours, two and a half hours. I got back in a half hour. It's terrible on the river right now."

 

In Rockford the Rock River water crested to 11.6 at Latham Road earlier this morning. High waters forced Sheriff Richard Meyers to declare a no wake ordinance.

 

Sheriff Richard Meyers of Winnebago County says "no was it has to be you know the boats have to go very slow where you're not creating that wake behind you and other words you can't come up to full speed. And plain out it's very slow moving."

 

The water levels may not start to recede until July 3rd. But the no wake ordinance will likely still be in affect on the river for the Fourth of July.

 

This could be a problem for Stateliners who plan on taking their boats out on Independence Day.   

 

Sheriff Meyers says "there is a lot of people who love to use the river over the fourth. They come down for the fireworks and we understand that. But the reality is boater safety of the upmost concern more than anything else."

 

Heuser says after his boating experience today, his Fourth Of July Plans are changing.

 

Heuser says "I guess I am not going to take it out there that's for sure. Unless I have a big motor. I'm probably going to sit at the shore."

 

The Rock River is still open for leisurely activities, including fishing. But officials are urging Stateliners to use all safety measure. That includes wearing a life vest near the river at all times.

 

Sheriff Meyers says "the river is always dangerous in it of itself, but when you add flooding conditions, it becomes that much more dangerous."

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