Millennials’ Poor Driving Behaviors Possible Reason for Driving Deaths Spike

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After years of declines, the U.S. is seeing a sharp spike in driving deaths, and a AAA report of poor driving behaviors indicates ‘millennials’ could be one reason why.

The National Safety Council reports that car fatalities exceeded 40,000 in 2016 for the first time in a decade despite improved safety features in vehicles today.  That’s a six percent increase over their 2015 findings.

Part of that could be lower gas prices combined with an improved economy has people driving more, but the NSC report finds that could at most account for half the increase.

A new report out by AAA could explain the other half.  It found the driving behavior a teens especially, who represent the highest crash risk, to top those reporting risky driving behaviors. 

“Alarmingly, some of the drivers ages 19-24 believe that their dangerous driving behavior is acceptable,” said Dr. David Yang, AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety executive director in a news release. “It’s critical that these drivers understand the potentially deadly consequences of engaging in these types of behaviors and that they change their behavior and attitudes in order to reverse the growing number of fatalities on U.S. roads.

Specifically, the report found: 

  • Drivers ages 19-24 were 1.6 times as likely as all drivers to report having read a text message or e-mail while driving in the last 30 days (66.1 percent vs. 40.2 percent.
  • Drivers ages 19-24 were nearly twice as likely as all drivers to report having typed or sent a text message or e-mail while driving (59.3 percent vs. 31.4 percent). 
  • Drivers ages 19-24 were 1.4 times as likely as all drivers to report having driven 10 mph over the speed limit on a residential street.  
  • Nearly 12 percent of drivers ages 19-24 reported feeling that it is acceptable to drive 10 mph over the speed limit in a school zone, compared to less than 5 percent of all drivers. 
  • Nearly 50 percent of drivers ages 19-24 reported driving through a light that had just turned red when they could have stopped safely, compared to 36 percent of all drivers. 
  • Nearly 14 percent of drivers ages 19-24 reported feeling that it is acceptable to drive through a light that just turned red, when they could have stopped safely, compared to about 6 percent of all drivers.

The survey results are part of the AAA Foundation’s annual Traffic Safety Culture Index, which identifies attitudes and behaviors related to traffic safety. The survey data are from a sample of 2,511 licensed drivers ages 16 and older who reported driving in the past 30 days. The AAA Foundation issued its first Traffic Safety Culture Index in 2008, and the latest report is online at www.AAAFoundation.org.

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