Study: Covid-19 virus itself, not vaccine, may cause infertility

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FILE – In this Wednesday, June 9, 2021 file photo, A nurse gives a shot of the Pfizer vaccine for COVID-19 to a pregnant woman in Montevideo, Uruguay. Two obstetricians’ groups are now recommending COVID-19 shots for all pregnant women, citing concerns over rising cases and low vaccination rates. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine said vaccinations in tens of thousands of pregnant women have shown the shots are safe and effective. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico, File)

(WTVO) — According to a new study, scientists found that contracting the COVID-19 virus itself could cause fertility issues, rather than the vaccine.

Researchers have found that the virus has affected fertility in male patients excessively more than female patients.

Studies have shown that women have had little to no menstruation or hormone cycle change. SARS-CoV-2 has been found in semen following Covid-19 with reports of testicular pain, inflammation, and decreased sperm count.

Dr. Marcelle Cedars, Reproductive Endocrinologist and Director of the University of California, San Francisco, Center for Reproductive Health, told NBC News that infections involving fevers do affect ovulation and sperm production.

One of the main symptoms of Covid-19 is a fever of 102 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, lasting at around three days; there is no indication as to why Covid-19 would be different than any other virus Dr. Cedars said.

Reproductive Endocrinologist Albert Hsu at MU Health Care recommends all those who are pregnant or trying to conceive should talk with their healthcare provider about vaccination, especially with the potential impact of Covid-19 on the male reproductive system.

Multiple medical professionals along with the Centers for Disease Control have said that there is no scientific evidence that shows the vaccine is related to infertility in patients.

Although many illnesses can result in infertility, doctors say there are no vaccines that cause these issues.

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